Response to Stack Overflow podcast 15

The recent Stack Overflow podcast is fantastic! Check it out here. Their fantasticness might have to do with Jeff and Joel answering listener questions more than directionless rambling. Some of the questions were interesting, and I want to add to their answers.

The one on time management

Like Jeff, I don’t really have a system. Like Joel, I got halfway through Getting Things Done and I decided the whole system is still too complex and I could have actually done something already. The concept of transferring tasks from your brain onto something, like paper (have a look at Todoodlist) or a PDA or a computer, is great though. I use my mobile phone to keep track of personal tasks, and the Outlook calendars and tasks to keep track of office work.

That said, my “system” if you want to call it that, is to keep people from annoying me.

Given similar levels of urgency, first do that task which has the most number of people irritating you.

It’s served me well so far.

The one on code review

I’ve never had a code review of my code. It’s not that I’m that good (it helped though), or I’m a pompous buffoon (I’m not). It’s that the people I’ve worked with, don’t care about code quality but more about whether the software worked. When the software failed, or was slow, then the code was checked.

The other reason is the small team I’m currently working in. There’s no one else available to check my code. My team leader trusts that I do my job and I’m grateful for that. The downside is, I don’t have anyone to talk to in my team. I’m the .NET guy! Or the front-end guy.

This is getting depressing. Moving on…

The one on interviews

I don’t know what it’s like in America, where the geographical context of Jeff and Joel’s conversation is. What I do know is, there was only one interview where I had to read and explain some code. It was something to do with string concatenation optimisation in Java. I believe it was an actual production issue, and the interviewers wanted to get a free answer from the interviewees.

Just go prepared. Read up on the company, prepare some questions of your own and revise some of the basic programming stuff. It might look bad if you asked for access to Google so you can find out the parameter signature of a basic function.

[Update] Joel also mentioned something about suits. If you’re not used to wearing office wear, and the company you’re interviewing for requires you to wear suits, well guess what? Practise wearing suits. My current job only required me to wear a long sleeved shirt, pants and (leather) shoes. And belts help too. Don’t you read fashion magazines? *smile* I remember squirming in that alien outfit for my first few interviews because I’m not used to wearing them… Don’t be like me.

I’ve heard of the puzzle questions in Microsoft and Google interviews. I’ve actually had one too. The puzzle had something to do with a cube.

The ones on managerial role and outsourcing

I’m linking them together because my answer is related to both: Offshoring. Occasionally, I’m in charge of a developer stationed in China. I had to write out instructions, program specifications, design layout and database table structures.

The only code reviews ever done was on the code of our Chinese colleagues. We’re (as in the Singapore team) supposed to be training them.

As I understand it, outsourcing means you delegate tasks to another company, usually in another country. Offshoring means you delegate tasks to another part of the mother company in another country.

Oh, you might want to read about my first outsourcing episode.

And that’s all from me. If you hadn’t done so, go listen to the podcast.