Basic guide to Excel Open XML

Ok, I don’t know why I didn’t think of it before. So it appears that there’s some need to create Excel files using Open XML SDK 2.0. I’m halfway done with my guide to doing that. It will be sold as an ebook (packaged with source code). It’s a consolidation of some of the articles I’ve already written on the subject, together with some all new articles. Included topics are:

  • How to create a stylesheet and use it
  • How to insert an image into a worksheet
  • How to insert multiple images into a worksheet
  • More advanced styling options
  • Setting column widths
  • Setting column and row settings (such as grouping columns and hiding rows)
  • Text alignment in a cell

When I teach, I believe in giving you the simplest explanation and code. This allows you to create more complex functions if you want. If I complicate it for you, you might not know what the individual parts are. It’s like giving you all 26 alphabets and let you play with it. Much better if you learn the individual alphabets and it’s up to you to form words with them.

I haven’t finalised the cost of the product, nor the release date. But I’m planning a “before Christmas” launch, so you should see it in my store soon. This is a heads up in case you’re agonising over a Christmas present for a programmer (or yourself). The price will be fair, considering that I will be saving you tons of hours of research and pain. It will also come with both C# and VB.NET supporting code.

Having worked in a mid-sized company, I understand that sometimes your IT department doesn’t allow third party products (or doesn’t have the budget to buy the license). I don’t consider the Open XML SDK 2.0 to be a third party product. Besides, it’s by Microsoft (and free!). Most companies should be able to accept that. The source code will only need the Open XML SDK (and the .NET Framework of course) to work.

My product license will be fairly flexible, so you can use my code to create commercial products. And the license is tied to the product, not to number of computers or developers or servers (or whatever complicated rule being used by other software companies). You only need to buy 1 copy. (But tell your friends to buy as well because I need to eat)

So yeah, that’s all I have to say. If there’s a particular topic you want me to cover, there’s still some time. Comment below and I might consider adding it to the guide. If this turns out to be popular (as in I get to eat a couple of meals because of it), I’ve got plans to include more Excel Open XML goodness, and even expand to Word and PowerPoint. We’ll see…