Next level of web development

The other day I met up with a friend who just finished giving a talk on HTML5. Well, not exactly HTML5 but more on the current mix of technologies that’s making up the current web development skills. The basic technologies involved are HTML5 (markup/data), Javascript (action) and CSS (presentation).

My friend used HTML5 in his title because there doesn’t seem to be a term for this new “level” of web development. And because he’s afraid his audience won’t know what he meant.

I remember writing Java applets (using the applet tag). I remember web sites without an ending paragraph p tag because the web browser was extremely tolerant. I remember web pages with font tags everywhere because CSS was practically non-existent back then. I remember displaying the current time using Javascript was an extremely cool thing to do.

Then web standards were introduced. HTML markup standards were encouraged. Javascript libraries started sprouting. And CSS came to the rescue, separating the presentation layer from the code layer.

As far as cross-browser issues go, adhering to current/latest HTML standards and using good Javascript libraries and using CSS meant that users are free to choose whichever browser they want. And the web site they’re visiting is expected to behave the same way and be rendered on the screen the same way (with maybe a few pixels off the mark as an error buffer, I guess) regardless of the web browser chosen.

And my friend is worried.

He’s worried that the current web developers are so used to the current set of technologies that basic programming problems are not even considered.

The big one is Internet access. He told me this group of (mostly young) web developers assume the Internet is as available as air. The idea that there might not be Internet access never crossed their minds, and so their web applications crash in the most spectacular manner when the user has no wifi.

And the worst part of it all was that these web developers think HTML5 is the current “web developing thing”. Sort of like “I’m a C# programmer” or “I’m a Python programmer”. They’re now developing in HTML5, without understanding that HTML5 is just the markup.

It’s the “as long as it works” mentality. I’m a practical man, so I agree with this mentality. I also do so with some understanding of the underlying technologies. This “HTML5, Javascript, CSS” combo seems like a black box, but it isn’t. Each part even advances independently of each other.

It’s like self-publishing on the Kindle without understanding the role of “traditional” editors and publishing houses. It’s like auto-tune of your song without understanding some music basics. It’s like relying on the auto-focusing of modern “prosumer” cameras without understanding basic camera equipment and terms.

I’m not saying they’re bad. I’m guilty of the last one. I use a camera that does everything for me when I click “Record” because I don’t want to fiddle with aperture and focal length and filters and such.

The problem is, if you don’t know (or care) what’s the underlying technology, you won’t know what to look for when things go wrong.

Question

Is there a term for this current level of HTML5, Javascript (I can only think of jQuery as a popular library) and CSS (CSS2/CSS3?)?

  1. James Carman

    I’m not sure if there is a term yet. I have heard these types of programmers described as front end developers and user experience developers.

    Our company hires out most of this type of work. I don’t put Facebook buttons onto our site, or add jQuery carousels.

    As the web matures our roles in relation to it change.

  2. Vincent

    “As the web matures our roles in relation to it change.” That, it does.

    I suppose you’re the business logic developer in your company. Most companies hire out non-business-critical tasks.

    However, as tablets and touch-screen gadgets grow in population like rabbits and in popularity like cat photos on the Internet, “front end” and “back end” tends to get mooshed together.

    I’d say 50% of front end development these days are also back end related. I’m just worried the web developers themselves can’t tell the difference…

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