Considerations for storing Excel cell value in code

You may hate Excel, but you may find a discussion of how Excel stores cell values interesting.

So I have a spreadsheet library. The biggest concern at the initial stage was how to store all the spreadsheet data efficiently. I hear people talking about millions of cells, so I’m scared. If my program stores a spreadsheet cell using 10 bytes (for example), a million cells would take up 10 million bytes in memory.

Let’s start by looking at all the different types of information you can type into a spreadsheet cell. You have:

  • booleans: TRUE or FALSE
  • numbers
  • text
  • rich text (different styled text within the entire text itself)
  • dates and times

For us programmers, “numbers” can be separated into floating point or integer types. An Excel user won’t see a difference.

So how does Excel actually store those values? I’m going to focus only on Open XML because I’m not interested in BIFF files…

  • booleans: TRUE stored as text “1” and FALSE stored as text “0”
  • numbers: stored as text
  • text: duh
  • rich text: stored in a separate shared strings list, with the index to that list stored as text here.
  • dates and times: stored as number that’s in text form

You will see everything is basically stored as text. That’s because the underlying XML files are text files. There’s a property (XML attribute) that differentiates the data, such as boolean, number, string, inline string, shared string.

So why are dates stored as a number? It’s easier to do date calculations with 41449 than “24 June 2013”. So how is this number obtained? See here.

So if you’ve been looking closely enough, Excel’s optimisation tactic is to store everything as numeric text as far as possible. So I want to follow that.

Before doing so however, I went to read what other people are doing AKA open source spreadsheet libraries. In code, they use an object to store the cell value. As in System.Object, the mother of all data types in .NET.

So you have an integer? Dump it into the object variable. Floating point? Dump into object. String of characters? Dump.

How do you read it out? Boxing and unboxing. You remember it’s a floating point value and cast it back from an object to a double variable type.

So what did I do? I have a double variable and a string variable, and I store the cell value in one or the other based on the input.

The “all in object” way has variable (no pun intended) memory size, based on the contents. Sort of. I’m not an expert in this.

My way has a fixed memory size for double’s. Each double takes up 8 bytes (for sure?). A string variable takes up variable size, but because the optimisation tactic is to store data as a number, I can assign the data to the double variable and set the string variable to null. This means the string variable size is sort of fixed too.

So this is what I do. If it’s a number, I store it in the double variable and set the string variable to null. If it’s text, I convert it to a number by using shared strings (out of scope for discussion here) and store the index into the double variable and set the string variable to null. The only cases where the string variable is actually used is if I store the text there, or if I want to store the actual number there (because “1.23456789” may not be stored exactly as that in a double variable. Go read on how floating points are implemented for details), which are rare.

According to Jon Skeet, strings take up 20 + (n/2)*4 bytes (where n is the number of characters). But a null string takes up 8 bytes (it’s either 4 or 8 bytes. I’ll assume the worse scenario).

This means for the most part, each cell has a double variable that takes up 8 bytes and a null string that takes up 8 bytes. A cell value of 10 or 3.14 or 12345678.9 takes up 16 bytes regardless.

Since 16 bytes is less than 20 + (n/2)*4 bytes, I save more memory in most cases. I also have less boxing and unboxing operations, which make things go faster.

File upload size limit in IIS

Yay file uploads. As if letting the users to type in stuff into the web application giving me SQL injection nightmares weren’t enough, now I have to let users upload files.

Peachy.

So during my investigations into the limits of file uploading, I found that I couldn’t upload a file more than 30MB on my test server. It failed faster than Superman could jump a building in a single bound, and with just as much sound.

In short, here are my findings. The default file size limit set in IIS (6 and below? Read on for more details) is 4MB. In IIS7 (on Windows Server 2008), the file size limit is 30MB (technically it’s 28.61MB because it’s 30000000 bytes but who’s keeping track. Hey you read on!).

So how do you change the limits? In the web.config file. We’re doing ASP.NET applications.

<httpRuntime executionTimeout="3600" maxRequestLength="20480" />

That will give you a timeout period of 1 hour (3600 seconds) and a file size limit of 20MB (20480 KB. Yes, that attribute is in kilobytes).

For IIS7, we do this:

<security>
    <requestFiltering>
        <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="134217728" />
    </requestFiltering>
</security>

That gives you a 128MB limit (128 * 1024 * 1024). Yes it’s in number of bytes.

So why was I doing file uploads? Documents from university staff or students. The most important of which is the final doctoral thesis.

I asked how large can that thesis be, assuming it’s in PDF form. I got an answer where a 40MB limit seems too small. Really?

I had trouble auto-generating an Excel file of 40MB just to test the server limits. Do you know how large 40MB is?

If it’s a video or sound file, then yes I can believe it. I have video files of over 100MB, some over 200MB. But a PDF? With mostly text?

Go check out the Open XML specs from ECMA. The largest document is about 28MB. It’s over 5000 pages. I doubt any thesis can match that number of pages.

Academic self-publishing

As of this writing, I’ve worked in the academic industry for slightly over 3 months. More on this later.

Claire Morgan sent me this article on academic self-publishing. There are good points and bad points regarding self-publishing, which are exaggerated particularly so for the academic industry. I should know, since I’m making a web application for internal use in a university.

As part of my work, I learnt a lot about how the Ph.D. degree students go through their academic years, and what are the processes they go through. Yeah my web application is going to be used by staff and future doctors (albeit Ph.D.’s). Go me.

One of the more important parts of being a Ph.D. student is publications. It’s not necessary to publish any papers but they help increase your credibility. Perhaps in helping with raising the impressions of examiners who attend your thesis defence. Every little bit helps, I guess.

But you can’t just publish your work anywhere. The publisher has to be of repute and your work must be peer reviewed.

This means self-publishing is looked down upon even more by the academic industry.

But wait!

There are 2 points I found interesting in Claire’s article.

The 1st point is that you don’t have to publish your entire work. Maybe a non-vital piece of your research but is still informative and useful. “Non-vital” is of course relative to your entire research work as a whole.

The 2nd point is that you can publish mistakes or research results that didn’t go anywhere. These don’t help you and your final research publication, but they might help some other poor fellow from wasting resources going down that route.

So what’s happening lately for me?

As I said, I’m working in a university now. Well, technically they outsourced the work to me so I’m still considered self-employed. We’ll see…

I’m stationed in a research lab. I’m surrounded by Ph.D. students. My manager is a Ph.D. student. Or at least he’s the project officer who’s my liaison between the IT support department and me. But psshht, semantics.

As part of my work, I’m using ASP.NET MVC (model-view-controller) and jQuery. Both of which I’m not familiar with at the start of my contract. Fun times… I was more of a back-end kind of guy.

Speaking of back-end, my spreadsheet library is doing well. Go check out SpreadsheetLight if you haven’t, and it’s also on NuGet (which I just learnt about, even though I’ve been using Visual Studio for like donkey years. Like I said, I’m more of a back-end guy. How do you pronounce “NuGet”? Like “nugget”?).

So yeah, if you haven’t, go read that article. Tell me what you think.