Academic self-publishing

As of this writing, I’ve worked in the academic industry for slightly over 3 months. More on this later.

Claire Morgan sent me this article on academic self-publishing. There are good points and bad points regarding self-publishing, which are exaggerated particularly so for the academic industry. I should know, since I’m making a web application for internal use in a university.

As part of my work, I learnt a lot about how the Ph.D. degree students go through their academic years, and what are the processes they go through. Yeah my web application is going to be used by staff and future doctors (albeit Ph.D.’s). Go me.

One of the more important parts of being a Ph.D. student is publications. It’s not necessary to publish any papers but they help increase your credibility. Perhaps in helping with raising the impressions of examiners who attend your thesis defence. Every little bit helps, I guess.

But you can’t just publish your work anywhere. The publisher has to be of repute and your work must be peer reviewed.

This means self-publishing is looked down upon even more by the academic industry.

But wait!

There are 2 points I found interesting in Claire’s article.

The 1st point is that you don’t have to publish your entire work. Maybe a non-vital piece of your research but is still informative and useful. “Non-vital” is of course relative to your entire research work as a whole.

The 2nd point is that you can publish mistakes or research results that didn’t go anywhere. These don’t help you and your final research publication, but they might help some other poor fellow from wasting resources going down that route.

So what’s happening lately for me?

As I said, I’m working in a university now. Well, technically they outsourced the work to me so I’m still considered self-employed. We’ll see…

I’m stationed in a research lab. I’m surrounded by Ph.D. students. My manager is a Ph.D. student. Or at least he’s the project officer who’s my liaison between the IT support department and me. But psshht, semantics.

As part of my work, I’m using ASP.NET MVC (model-view-controller) and jQuery. Both of which I’m not familiar with at the start of my contract. Fun times… I was more of a back-end kind of guy.

Speaking of back-end, my spreadsheet library is doing well. Go check out SpreadsheetLight if you haven’t, and it’s also on NuGet (which I just learnt about, even though I’ve been using Visual Studio for like donkey years. Like I said, I’m more of a back-end guy. How do you pronounce “NuGet”? Like “nugget”?).

So yeah, if you haven’t, go read that article. Tell me what you think.

In The Mirror (cover)

This is one of my favourite piano pieces by Yanni.

I’m not a pianist. I’ve never taken piano lessons. I’m like grade -1 or something. This took me over a dozen tries…

Credits and permission granted from:

Music by Yanni
23rd Street publishing Inc/Yanni Music Publishing (ASCAP)
Used by Permission. All Rights Reserved

Passion problems

It was a fluke. I just fell into the spreadsheet business.

My main products currently, both in writing and in code, revolve around spreadsheets. Specifically around Excel workbooks or spreadsheets or files or whatever you call them.

I like programming and writing code. I’m great at it. I just didn’t specifically choose making spreadsheet libraries.

There’s a say out there about following your passion and “then the money will follow”. The problem is that you might just wait for that passion of yours to appear.

People pay for skill. They pay for convenience, pain relief, time saving, effort saving, money saving, revenue generation. They pay for what’s important to them. They don’t pay for your passion.

When it all started, I was working in the billing support department. Lots of financial numbers flying around. Lots of spreadsheets needed.

So I was forced to figure out a way to create Excel files with a minimum of fuss. I started with just XML files which Excel accepted.

Then more complexity was needed. Slowly I honed my skills at deciphering what users want, what Excel does behind the scenes and how to create Excel files.

By making my spreadsheet library as easy to use as using Excel, I am now an expert at using Excel.

A user unchecks a checkbox. I do the same thing and see what changes in the spreadsheet.

I may not be one of those Excel gurus who write 500 page Excel user guides, but I’m close enough. My spreadsheet library may not have all the features of commercial libraries that cost thousands of dollars, but it bloody well does the job in the most accessible manner possible.

This is skill honed over hours of study and practice and experimentation.

The funny thing is, I kinda have a passion for it developed over time. Oh I still hate Excel sometimes for being weird or incomprehensible in behaviour, but it’s mostly in jest. Ok I have an unseemly hatred for how Excel calculates column widths…

Develop a skill worth paying for. You may have a passion for playing video games but only a few people manage to be paid doing so. (if you’re interested, check out the gameplay videos on YouTube. That’s one way of being paid. Advertising or even sponsorship)

What are your marketable skills? How can you become so good that people have to pay attention to you, and thus pay you to help them?

Software is everywhere

Coming soon to toasters and refrigerators. YouTube hates me, or WMV files, because the rendered video has visual static…

And celebrate whatever holiday is meaningful to you. Happy holidays!

The sparrow is complete

It is a time of change. Some people give up and wait for changes to happen to them. Some people take action and make changes happen. Don’t be the former.

Previously, I summarised the recent developments in the online business world. Despite the opportunities available, it’s still easier to just sit back and do what you’ve always done.

There’s a quote from Twyla Tharp, a dance choreographer about creative blocks.

Do something. Anything.

The point is to get something done, even if it doesn’t specifically solve the problem you have right then. That gives you a sense of accomplishment, a feeling of progress, and you can channel that into doing more actions and eventually you’ll get to fixing your creative block.

Some people wait for the stars to align before doing anything. Some people wait for all the traffic lights to turn green before doing anything.

Sure your financial situation isn’t ideal. Sure your mother-in-law keeps breathing down you neck. Sure your work hours aren’t quite what you want. Sure you might like to have more space in your home.

But if you wait for everything to be perfect, you’ll never get to making that baby. Do you want to make babies or not?

There’s a Chinese saying that goes something like “The sparrow may be small, but it has all 5 major organs.” I don’t know what those internal organs are, probably heart, lungs, brain, kidney, liver?

The point is that the sparrow is complete, small as it is. It functions. It can fly, it can eat, and it can continue to make small baby sparrows.

In the business context, people almost always want to know more before starting. But the only real way to find out if you need to know something, is to start and then find out that you need it. Until you’ve done a task yourself and find it distasteful, you don’t really need to outsource it. Until you’ve answered customer questions, you don’t know how your customer service officers should behave.

Make a sparrow first. You can tweak it into an eagle later on.