Singularity Magazine April 2011

Singularity Magazine April 2011

For April 2011, we have our “thickest” magazine issue ever. 95 pages! Even I’m surprised…

Download the April 2011 issue of Singularity magazine (about 11MB).

I have the pleasure of interviewing Thom Chambers, a fellow magazine editor who runs the In Treehouses magazine.

You might notice that I’m sort of slowing down writing for the blog here in favour of writing for my magazine. One reason is that I find some of my ideas harder or inappropriate to write here, due to design or expression or simply the idea itself. Another reason is that I feel a greater satisfaction of having created something, compared to just a blog post. You will do well subscribing to my magazine. I will still write here, just maybe not as often. Maybe.

Behind the scenes

Visits to 2 cafes, coverage of 2 events, 1 gruesome evening at an art museum and 95 pages later, I’m tired. To say the least. March was gruelling, what with working on my small business and writing the magazine and all. I asked my fairy helpers for, well, additional help. They did this:

Double Vincent

There once was a man named Vincent
Whose work had caused him to be spent
He bathed in fairy goo
And then split into two
Thus the laws of physics were bent

Let’s not do this too often…

Singularity Magazine March 2011

Singularity Magazine March 2011

So in a fortnight’s time, it will be Pi Day! Are you excited? Yeah? Yes? no? Oh, you don’t care… Well, you get to eat pies… oh you love pies? Great! So look out on the Internet on March 14. Why March 14? Because the first three digits of PI (3.14159) is 3, 1 and 4. You know, 3/14 as a date?

Anyway, the March 2011 issue of Singularity magazine is available! I’d chomp right through a bushel of cookies if I had it right now. Because I’m that happy. Speaking of cookies, there’s a special report on CookieBank, a sweet way of microlending. Check it out in the magazine.

Since we have Pi Day, we can’t escape from mathematics, right? I bring you an interview with mathematician, John D. Cook. He says contrary to popular understanding, Taylor series approximations are not used to calculate trigonometric functions in computer chips. What, you didn’t know? Neither did I!

Download the March issue right now (about 3MB)

Behind the scenes

So the fairies I hired last month are really good. They helped me track down nice pictures to use in the magazine, small bits of info here and there, do some design stuff. All they ask for is that I feed them, which is ok, since they eat very little. And that I let them take rides on my cat (assistant). My cat graciously obliged (after I begged her imperial Majesty for a few days. I really needed the fairies to help).

There was one small tiny bit of a commotion. An incident really. The fairies were exploring the house, and they settled near my cat’s food bowls. They picked a couple of pieces of dry cat food out.

KABLOOEEE!!

My cat pounced onto the fairies. Luckily, no fairy was hurt (they fly and flee fast, I’ll give them that). Otherwise I’d have to answer to the Magical Minist… what? Oh, I’m not supposed to tell them. Uh, forget what I said.

So. My cat’s fine with the feline rides. But touch her food bowls and you die. Period.